Weatherford High School

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Barmore, Steven » Steven Barmore

Steven Barmore

Welcome to my webpage. I teach English II and Debate I and II.
 
If you would like to contact me, you might reach me by phone: 817-598-2858, extension 3602. My email: sbarmore@weatherfordisd.com . If you should contact me via email, you can reasonably expect a response within 24 hours. Please do not hesitate to ask questions, and feel free to schedule a meeting. My classroom is H205, and my conference period is 7th.
 
Thank you.
 
 
 
 

English II Course Information

 

This class is designed to aid the student in developing skills in writing, analytical reading, and critical thinking.  Success in this course will be determined by the degree to which the student meets or exceeds the expectations set for him or her by the teacher. It is my goal to equip the students with reading and writing skills that will make them more successful in their academic and everyday lives. In order for this to be possible, students must be present, prompt, and prepared.

 

Grading:

Minor Grades : 50% (daily writing activities, drafts, vocabulary exercises, grammar exercises, vocabulary quizzes , reading quizzes, minor writing assignments, participation in group discussions)

Major Grades : 50% (major writing assignments constitute the majority of this category)

 

Absences:

If a student is absent, it is his/her responsibility to get the missed work and set up a time to come in and discuss with the teacher any information that he/she does not understand. It is the responsibility of the student to get missed information or work from a classmate if he/she is unexcused and tardy.

 

Late Work

Assignments that are not turned in by the end of the class day on the day they are due will be assessed according to the situation, and extremely late work without reasonable cause will receive a maximum grade of 50. Work should ALWAYS be turned in, however--any grade is always better than a zero.

 

Materials*:

Notebook paper

Pen and pencil

Highlighters

            *I will provide a folder in which students will store notes and in-progress work. This folder will remain stored in the classroom.



Plagiarism

Plagiarism is an unacceptable compromising of the integrity of the student and his/her respect for the ideas and writing of others. Plagiarism will result in a zero on the assignment.

            What is Plagiarism?

            Plagiarism is defined (for the purposes of this course) as, but not limited to:

→ Obvious, substantial, verbatim (word for word) reproduction of information

→ Fabrication of sources, falsification of page numbers, or other deliberate misdocumentation

→ Submission of others' work as the students' own.  This applies to uncited paraphrasing of another's ideas as well as verbatim use of others' words. (Others' may refer to either scholarly sources, online "cribbed" essays, or the work of other students).

                                                                                               

Definitions from: http://www.ledyard.net/lhs/parents/plagiarism.html

 

 

Syllabus: English II

 

Some skills that are integral to the study of the English language, such as vocabulary development, grammar and syntax, and spelling and mechanics will be fundamental to student learning in English II and are a part of the year’s daily instruction. Each unit below does not represent a six weeks of study, but a unit of skill development which may span anywhere from two to eight weeks. Every unit involves instruction in the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate the ideas, situations, and texts of our society in order to succeed as global citizens.

 

Fall 2017

IDENTIFICATION: DEFINING SELF THROUGH THE WRITTEN WORD

 

With a strong focus on syntax and grammar instruction, we will explore world literature, with a focus on how authors’ choices in construction and language create purpose in short texts centering on personal identity. In response to these texts, we will model as well as independently craft effective description and narration within a creative and an expository piece.

 

CONFRONTATION: DISCOVERING AND ANALYZING THE ARGUMENTS OF OTHERS

 

Using student and teacher-selected texts as anchors, we will synthesize various short nonfiction pieces, as well as poems and drama, in an effort to better understand and express the effects of cultural value on the individual. We will experience the writing process through a study of modes such as narration, description, definition, compare/contrast, and cause/effect, as well through a continued daily focus on embedded syntax and grammar instruction and revision of the student’s writing. We will hone our analytical writing skills through further work with topic sentence construction, choice of appropriate evidence, embedding of quotes, and insightful commentary. We will study the craft of writing by reading and analyzing the language of published writers who explore issues associate with the individual’s relationship to his or her culture, then will craft both analyses and original literary and persuasive pieces, including a culminating persuasive essay which synthesizes multiple texts read within the unit to craft a commentary on contemporary life.

 

 

Spring 2018

 

INTERSECTION: EXPLORING PERSONAL ROLES IN CULTURAL COMMUNITIES

 

Using student and teacher-selected texts, we will take an analytical look at persuasion and argument through poetry, nonfiction, and drama. Students will evaluate historical and cultural influences on literature as well as the implications of literature as a political venue for social commentary and as a call to action for social reform. Writing will focus on analysis of literature and nonfiction, as well as the crafting of arguments and other persuasive texts addressing issues of social justice: past, present, and future. Students will study the effects of media persuasion on culture and society, reading visual and written texts in various modes, from essays to social media to charts, graphs, and advertisements, as well as film and documentary. The critical evaluation of ideas and texts will result in insightful analysis and persuasion.

 

DECISIONS: EVALUATING AND EXPRESSING OUR POSITIONS

 

Students will discuss controversial ideas in visual and written texts in order to formulate opinions and explore/evaluate topics. This discussion and evaluation will lead to a researched paper that is argumentative in nature, and skill development in the analysis of sources, evaluation of credibility of source information, selection of evidence from sources, and documentation of sources will be the focus.

 

 

 

 

Debate Course Information

 

This class is designed to aid the student in developing skills in research, analytical reading, critical thinking, active listening, and persuasive speaking. Success in this course will be determined by the degree to which the student meets or exceeds the expectations set for him or her by the teacher. It is my goal to equip the students with skills that will make them more successful in their academic and everyday lives. In order for this to be possible, students must be present, prompt, and prepared.

 

Grading:

Minor Grades : 50% (daily writing activities, drafts, vocabulary exercises, grammar exercises, vocabulary quizzes , reading quizzes, minor writing assignments, participation in group discussions)

Major Grades : 50% (major writing assignments constitute the majority of this category)

 

*Note about CANVAS: Many minor assignments will be completed and graded only on Canvas.

 

Absences:

If a student is absent, it is his/her responsibility to get the missed work and set up a time to come in and discuss with the teacher any information that he/she does not understand. It is the responsibility of the student to get missed information or work from a classmate if he/she is unexcused and tardy.

 

Late Work

Assignments that are not turned in at or before their proper deadlines will be assessed according to the situation, and extremely late work without reasonable cause will receive a maximum grade of 50. Work should ALWAYS be turned in, however--any grade is always better than a zero.

 

Materials:

It is important that students come to class each day prepared and organized. . Students will need to be able to reference evidence and cases. The supplies on this list will help them to do this.

  • Writing utensil
  • Highlighter
  • Spiral and/or notebook paper
  • One 2-3 inch binder
  • One legal notepad

.

 

 

 

Syllabus: Debate I and II

 

Each unit below represents a unit of skill development which will span the course of the entire academic year. There is considerable overlap between the four units below, and every unit involves instruction in the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate the ideas, situations, and texts of contemporary life.  

 

DEBATE-SPECIFIC RULES, REGULATIONS, TERMS AND CONDITIONS

 

Students will become familiar with the rules and procedures of both Lincoln-Douglas and Cross-Examination (CX) Debate, and they will gain experience debating in these contests. While every student will be required to debate in this class, no student will be required to join the WHS Debate Team(s); rather, those interested in joining our teams will be required to try-out. Every student will be expected to participate in every debate event held in the classroom under such roles that include, but are not limited to: debater, flow-er, judge, timer, researcher, and consultant. By the end of the first six-weeks, students will grasp the fundamental rules and concepts that guide academic debate under these two contest-models.

 

LOGIC

 

Students will become familiar with, and hopefully attain facility at and appreciation for, the science of Logic. Students will learn to distinguish terms from propositions, syllogisms from enthymemes, as well as how to evaluate each on the respective bases of clarity, truth, validity, and soundness. Students will look at both material and formal fallacies so as to avoid errors in their own reasoning and to identify them in the reasoning of others. And they will gain an understanding of the differences between deductive, inductive, and abductive logic.

 

RHETORIC

 

Students will become familiar with, and hopefully elect to use responsibly, the art of rhetoric. Using Aristotle’s Rhetoric as our guide, students will gain insight into the tools useful to reasoned, impassioned, and credible discourse. Students will learn to appreciate appeals to reason, emotion, and authority, and acquire the skills needed to implement these appeals in their own debating, writing, and speaking. Students will be required to speak in class, before their peers. They will be given instruction on how to speak well, to be both informative and persuasive.

 

 

PHILOSOPHY

 

Students will become familiar with the great intellectual tradition of the West, grounded in Plato, Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. They will also survey modern and contemporary thinkers and their respective schools. From this, they will gain an appreciation for the source of political and cultural ideas and ideals regnant today, as well as historical movements and conflicts, and the theories behind practices both big and small. Students will be taught to think, not taught what to think. Students will be taught to think critically, but not simply to be critical of everything. Familiarity with the Western philosophical tradition is beneficial as an end in itself and is useful to the practical end of debating, e.g. LD Debate is also called “Values Debate”, and requires (in order to win, anyway) extensive knowledge of ethical theories.